Available from Carroll & Graf, Fall 2006
1920 Presidential
Election Chronology
  • Jan. 1 18th Amendment goes into effect.
  • Jan. 2-6 Palmer raids; over 6,000 radicals arrested.
  • Jan. 2 Franklin D. Roosevelt privately writes than
    there would be "none better" than Herbert Hoover for
    president.
  • Jan. 3 FDR writes in Army & Navy Journal re:
    Navy prison policies
  • January Trial of Rev. Samuel N. Kent on morals
    charges; Kent acquitted.
  • Jan.  4 James Reynolds assumes leadership of
    Calvin Coolidge campaign.
  • Jan. 6 - Rhode Island and Kentucky ratify the 19th
    amendment.
  • Jan. 6 William Gibbs McAdoo quits as United
    Artists general counsel.
  • Jan. 7 Calvin Coolidge says he will not actively seek
    the presidency.
  • Jan. 7 Governor Alfred E. Smith urges New York
    State Legislature to rescind ratification of 18th
    Amendment.
  • Jan. 8 Democrats' Jackson Day Dinner. William
    Jennings Bryan blasts Wilson. James Gerard praises
    Herbert Hoover.
  • Jan. 8 Democrats decide on San Francisco as
    convention site.
  • Jan. 8 Louis B. Wehle confers with Angus McLean
    re: a Herbert Hoover-FDR ticket.
  • Jan. 9 Louis Wehle confers with Attorney General
    A. Mitchell Palmer and Vance McCormick re: a
    Hoover-FDR ticket.
  • Jan. 10 House of Representatives refuses to seat
    Wisconsin Socialist Congressman Victor Berger.
  • Jan. 10 Louis Wehle confers with FDR regarding a
    Hoover-FDR ticket.
  • Jan. 10 League of Nations convenes.
  • Jan. 12 Oregon ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Jan. 15 Wehle confers with House re: a Hoover-
    FDR ticket.
  • Jan. 15 Carter Glass leaves as Secretary of the
    Treasury.
  • Jan. 16 Indiana ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Jan. 16 Wehle confers with Hoover.
  • Jan. 17 Court of Naval Inquiry appointed to review
    Newport scandal.
  • Jan. 18 Providence Journal publisher John Rathom
    telegraphs Senate Committee on Naval Affairs regarding
    Newport scandal.
  • Jan. 19 Special Senate Committee on Naval Affairs
    Subcommittee appointed to investigate Newport scandal.
  • Jan. 20 New Jersey Governor Edward Edwards
    introduces bill legalizing 5% beer.
  • Jan. 22 John Rathom telegraphs FDR re: Newport
    navy scandal.
  • Jan 24 FDR writes Captain Taussig re: homosexuals
    being returned to the service.
  • Jan. 24 Calvin Coolidge sworn in to second term as
    Governor of Massachusetts.
  • Jan. 25 Coolidge says he is not a candidate.
  • Jan. 26 Wyoming ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Jan [date unknown] Grayson advises Wilson to
    resign.
  • Jan. 27 Hitchcock reservation to Article 10 rejected
    by Republicans.
  • Jan. 28 South Carolina rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • Jan. 30 Bureau of Internal Revenue issues
    regulations for medicinal alcohol.
  • Feb. 1 FDR speech at Brooklyn Academy of Music.
  • Feb. 1 Ohio governor James M. Cox announces his
    candidacy.
  • Feb. 1 England and France declare they would
    accept the Senate's reservations.
  • Feb. 7 Wilson writes Secretary of State Robert
    Lansing re: cabinet meetings.
  • Feb. 7 Nevada ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Feb. 10 Dr. Hugh Young of Johns Hopkins
    announces Wilson was "organically sound, able-minded
    and able-bodied"
  • Feb. 10 Senate Foreign Relation Committee
    approves of Treaty with Lodge reservations.
  • Feb. 10 New Jersey ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Feb. 11 Idaho ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Feb. 12 Arizona and New Mexico ratify the 19th
    Amendment; Virginia rejects it.
  • Feb. 12 FDR's former mistress Lucy Mercer marries
    Winthrop Rutherford.
  • Feb. 13 Secretary of State Robert Lansing resigns.
  • Feb. 14-16 League of Women Voters founded,
    Chicago
  • Feb. 19 Frank Petroni found not guilty by
    Hammond, Indiana jury, after shooting Frank Petrich for
    yelling, "To hell with the United States."
  • Feb. 19 Republican National Committee announces
    it will accept to donations of over $1,000.
  • Feb. 23 Hoover says he must no more about the
    parties' platforms before choosing between them.
  • Feb. 24 Herbert Hoover opts out of Georgia
    Democratic primary.
  • Feb. 24 Maryland rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • Feb. 25 Woodrow Wilson names Bainbridge Colby
    Secretary of State.
  • Feb. 26 Herbert Hoover says he is not a candidate.
  • Feb. 28 Oklahoma ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Feb. 29 New York Times presents Daugherty's
    prediction on the GOP convention.
  • Mar. 1 A. Mitchell Palmer formally announces,
    enters Georgia primary.
  • Mar. 6 Hoover declines to compete in the California
    Democrat primary.
  • Mar. 6 The Philippine Assembly rejects woman
    suffrage.
  • Mar. 9 Gen. Leonard Wood and Herbert Hoover
    win New Hampshire primaries.
  • Mar. 10 West Virginia ratifies 19th amendment after
    State Senator Jesse A. Bloch races back from California
    to vote.
  • Mar. 12 Seven IWW members found guilty in
    Centralia Massacre.
  • Mar. 14 Eugene V. Debs says he accept Socialist
    Party presidential nomination.
  • Mar. 15 Leonard Wood wins Minnesota primary,
    beating Harding and Hoover.
  • Mar. 15 Senate defeats treaty with 15 Lodge
    reservations 49-35.
  • Mar. 16 Senator Hiram Johnson runs unopposed in
    North Dakota primary.
  • Mar. 17 Illinois Gov. Frank O. Lowden captures
    Virginia Republican convention.
  • Mar. 19 U. S. Senate again rejects Treaty of
    Versailles (with Lodge reservations), 49-35.
  • Mar. 22 -- Washington ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Mar. 22 -- Bainbridge Colby confirmed by the Senate.
  • Mar. 23 -- Leonard Wood wins South Dakota primary.
  • Mar. 24 -- Capt. J. F. Lucey announces a conference
    of Hoover supporters will be held in Chicago.
  • Mar. 25 -- Delaware rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • Mar. 25 -- Woodrow Wilson confides to Grayson that
    he will accept a draft.
  • Mar. 26 -- New York World charges excessive
    spending in Wood race.
  • Mar. 29 -- Mississippi rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • Mar. 30 -- Herbert Hoover wires the California Hoover
    Club that he will accept the GOP nomination under
    certain conditions.
  • Mar. Charles Scribner's & Sons publishes Lothrop
    Stoddard's The Rising Tide of Color Against White
    Supremacy.
  • April 1 -- New York State Assembly expels five
    Socialist members.
  • Apr. 3 -- Leonard Wood endorses women's suffrage.
  • Apr. 6 -- Daughter born to Mr. & Mrs. William Gibbs
    McAdoo.
  • Apr. 6 -- Senator Robert La Follette sweeps Wisconsin
    primary.
  • Apr. 6 -- Uninstructed slate wins New York State GOP
    Primary.
  • Apr. 6 -- Herbert Hoover fails in attempt to register in
    California.
  • Apr. 7 -- Hoover wins Michigan Democratic primary;
    Palmer finishes last. Johnson wins Michigan Republican
    primary.
  • Apr. 14 -- Wilson presides over Cabinet for the first
    time since September 2, 1919.
  • Apr. 15 -- South Braintree, Massachusetts payroll
    robbery and murder.
  • Apr. 18 -- Helen Hughes, daughter of Charles Evans
    Hughes, dies of tuberculosis.
  • Apr. 20 -- Senators Hiram Johnson and Gilbert
    Hitchcock win Nebraska primaries.
  • Apr. 22 -- Illinois, Wisconsin primaries. Frank O.
    Lowden wins Illinois primary.
  • Apr. 23 -- Hoover and Harding fare badly as Johnson
    wins Montana primary.
  • Apr. 27 -- Unpledged delegates win Massachusetts
    GOP primary.
  • Apr. 27 -- Wood narrowly defeats Johnson in New
    Jersey primary. Governor Edward Edwards unopposed
    in Democratic primary.
  • Apr. 27 -- Senator Warren G. Harding narrowly defeats
    Leonard Wood in Ohio primary. Harry M. Daugherty
    loses as delegate. James M. Cox unopposed in
    Democratic primary.
  • Apr. 27 -- Oscar W. Underwood of Alabama becomes
    new Senate Minority Leader.
  • May 1 -- Radical unrest predicted by A. Mitchell
    Palmer fails to materialize.
  • May 2 -- Brooklyn anarchist Andrea Salcedo leaps to
    his death, while in federal custody.
  • May 3 -- Leonard Wood defeats Hiram Johnson in
    Maryland primary.
  • May 4 -- Hiram Johnson defeats Herbert Hoover in
    California primary.
  • May 5 -- Wood wins Indiana primary. Harding finishes
    a poor fourth.
  • May 5 Nicola Sacco and BartolomeoVanzetti
    arrested in Bridgewater, Massachusetts for South
    Braintree robbery.
  • May 6 -- Calvin Coolidge vetoes 2.75% beer bill.
  • May 8 -- Dunn Court of Inquiry resumes hearings.
  • May 13 -- Socialist Party nominates Eugene V. Debs
    for president.
  • May 14 -- The Socialist Party votes to align itself with
    Lenin's Third International.
  • May 14 -- Harding delivers "normalcy" speech in
    Boston.
  • May 18 -- Governor Sproul delegates win GOP
    Pennsylvania primary.
  • May 18 -- Calvin Coolidge's stepmother, Carrie Brown
    Coolidge, dies.
  • May 19 -- Leonard Wood wins non-binding Vermont
    primary.
  • May 20 -- Senate authorizes investigate on campaign
    finances.
  • May 20 Congress ends state of war by joint
    resolution (vetoed by Woodrow Wilson).
  • May 21 -- Hiram Johnson defeats wood in Oregon
    primary.
  • May 22 -- First installment ("The Jew in Character and
    Business") of ninety-one part series, "The International
    Jew: The World's Problem" begins in Henry Ford's
    Dearborn Independent.
  • May 24 -- Sen. Howard Sutherland defeats Gen.
    Leonard Wood in West Virginia primary.
  • May 29 -- Woodrow Wilson pardons Kate Richards
    O'Hare.
  • May 29 -- Socialist Party presidential notification of
    Eugene Debs.
  • May 30 -- New York Labor Party (Farmer-Labor
    Party) nominates Rose Schneiderman for United States
    Senate and Mrs. William J. Fink for Comptroller.
  • June 1 -- United States Supreme Court rules state
    referenda not part of the federal constitutional
    amendment process.
  • June 3 -- American Jewish Committee telegraphs Ford
    protesting "The International Jew."
  • June 5 -- Literary Digest poll puts Warren G. Harding
    eighth among Republican presidential candidates, below
    even Calvin Coolidge and William Howard Taft.
  • June 7 -- Harding visits mistress Nan Britton in Chicago.
  • June 8 -- Republican National Convention opens;
    Senator Henry Cabot Lodge delivers keynote address.
  • June 8 -- Louisiana Senate rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • June 12 -- Republican Party nominates Warren G.
    Harding for president.
  • June 13 -- Socialist Vice Presidential candidate
    Seymour Stedman opens his campaign in Chicago.
  • June 17 -- New York World publishes interview with
    Wilson.
  • June 18 -- McAdoo announces "irrevocable" decision
    not to seek presidency.
  • June 20 -- Grover Cleveland Redding of the Star Order
    of Ethiopia shoots police officer and ignites a Chicago
    race riot.
  • June 21 Suffragette Alice Paul visits Harding.
  • June 22 -- Ed Scobey announces Harding slogan will
    be "Back to Normal."
  • June 22 -- New York World publishes a photo of
    Wilson at work.
  • June 23 -- Tammany boss Charles F. Murphy indicted.
  • June 25 -- Calvin Coolidge says he won't pressure
    Vermont and Connecticut to ratify the 19th Amendment.
  • June 26 -- Dearborn Independent begins serializing
    "The Protocols of The Learned Elders of Zion. "
  • June 27 -- Republican National Committee Chairman
    Will Hays meets with Carrie Phillips.
  • June 27 -- William Gibbs McAdoo says he will accept
    a nomination.
  • June 28 -- Democratic National Convention opens;
    FDR grabs New York delegation standard.
  • July 29 -- Dudley Field Malone nominated by New
    York State Farmer-Labor Party for Governor.
  • June 30 -- Franklin Delano Roosevelt places Al Smith
    in nomination.
  • June [date unknown] -- KKK engaged two
    professional fundraisers: Edward Young Clarke and
    Mrs. Elizabeth Tyler.
  • July 1 -- BartolomeoVanzetti convicted of Bridgewater
    robbery.
  • July 1 -- Louisiana rejects the 19th Amendment.
  • July 1 -- Jim Philips and Harding confer in Washington.
  • July 1 -- Judson Welliver writes to Senator Borah,
    complaining of Harding.
  • July 4 -- Harding and Coolidge campaign phonograph
    records released.
  • July 5 -- Democratic Party nominates James M. Cox
    for president.
  • July 6 -- Democratic Party nominates Franklin D.
    Roosevelt for vice-president.
  • July 14 -- Farmer-Labor Party nominates Parley
    Christensen for president and Max Hayes for vice
    president.
  • July 14 -- Single Tax Party nominates Robert C.
    MacAuley for president.
  • July 10 -- Warren G. Harding announces Calvin
    Coolidge will sit in cabinet.
  • July 12 -- Vermont Governor Percival Clements
    declines to call a special legislative session to ratify the
    19th Amendment.
  • July 16 -- Vice President Thomas Marshall telegraphs
    congratulations to Coolidge.
  • July 18 -- James M. Cox and FDR confer with Wilson
    at the White House.
  • July 20 -- George White of Ohio replaces Homer
    Cummings as Democratic National Chairman.
  • July 22 -- Prohibition Party, meeting at Omaha,
    nominates Aaron S. Watkins for president and D. Leigh
    Colvin for vice-president.
  • July 22 -- Warren G. Harding notified of nomination at
    Marion, Ohio.
  • July 27 -- Calvin Coolidge notified of nomination at
    Northampton, Massachusetts.
  • Aug. 6 -- Franklin D. Roosevelt retires from the Navy
    Department.
  • Aug. 6 -- Former Massachusetts Senator Murray Crane
    falls into a coma.
  • Aug. 8 -- Cox official notified of nomination; Cox
    refuses FDR's request to sit in on cabinet.
  • Aug. 9 -- Franklin D. Roosevelt officially notified of
    nomination at Hyde Park
  • Aug. 10 -- Marcus Garvey apologizes to New York
    District Attorney Swann to avoid a libel suit.
  • Aug. 11 -- J. E. Ferguson and W. J. Hough nominated
    by American Party at Fort Worth.
  • Aug. 11 -- Aaron S. Watkins receives notification of
    Prohibition Party nomination.
  • Aug. 17 -- Marcus Garvey elected provisional president
    of Africa.
  • Aug. 17 -- The North Carolina Senate votes to delay
    action on suffrage until 1921.
  • Aug. 18 -- FDR boasts of writing Haiti's constitution.
  • Aug. 18 -- Delegation from the Society of American
    Indians meets separately with Harding and Cox.
  • Aug. 20 -- Harding campaign announces Lillian Russell
    will campaign for the ticket.
  • Aug. 21 -- FDR praises Centralia incident.
  • Aug. 24 -- Al Jolson and "Harding and Coolidge
    Theatrical League of America" visit Marion, Ohio.
  • Aug. 28 -- Tennessee ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Aug. 28 -- Harding declares himself in favor of "an
    association of nations."
  • Aug. 28 -- Secretary of State Colby ratifies the 19th
    Amendment.
  • Aug. 30 -- Socialist-Labor Party nominates William W.
    Cox and August Gillhaus.
  • Sept. 2 -- Chicago Cubs visit Marion.
  • Sept. 7 -- Warren Harding begins first campaign swing.
  • Sept. 8 -- Harding addresses crowd of 40,000 at
    Minnesota State Fair.
  • Sept. 11 -- Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti
    indicted for South Braintree robbery.
  • Sept. 14 -- Connecticut ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • Sept. 14 -- James Wadsworth Jr. defeats Ella A. Boole
    for the Republican nomination for United State Senate in
    New York; Lt. Gov. Harry C. Walker defeats
    Schenectady Mayor George Lunn in the Democratic
    primary.
  • Sept. 16 -- Wall Street bombed by Sacco and Vanzetti
    associate Michael Buda.
  • Sept. 18 -- "Foreign Voters Day" in Marion.
  • Sept. 21 -- Three Socialist members again expelled
    from New York State Assembly.
  • Sept. 23 -- Two seated Socialists resign from New
    York State Assembly.
  • Sept. 28 -- Seven White Sox players indicted for
    throwing the 1919 World Series.
  • Oct. -- William Estabrook Chancellor's handbills begin
    circulating re: Harding ancestry.
  • Oct. 2 -- Senator Murray Crane dies.
  • Oct. 4 -- Funeral of Murray Crane; Coolidge refuses to
    be photographed with Lodge.
  • Oct. 7 -- Harding in Des Moines calls not for
    "interpretation but rejection" of the league.
  • Oct. 7 -- Journalist John Reed dies at Moscow.
  • Oct. 9 -- Prof. Irving Fisher organizes pro-League
    League Independents.
  • Oct. 14 -- Statement of the 31 (pro-League
    Republicans) endorses Harding.
  • Oct. 24 -- Republican National Committee reveals
    Rathom letter to FDR re: Newport navy scandals.
  • Oct. 25 - FDR sues John Rathom for $500,000 for
    criminal libel.
  • Oct. 26 Archibald MacLeish and Hoover League of
    Harvard question Hoover: Harding and League.
  • Oct. 28 -- Woodrow Wilson makes first statement of
    campaign, doesn't mention Cox.
  • Oct. 28 Calvin Coolidge campaigns in Manhattan;
    Grace Coolidge leads a torchlight parade in Boston.
  • Oct. 29 Wooster College fires William E. Chancellor.
  • Oct. Widespread nightrider raids on black-owned
    cotton gins reported in Georgia and Alabama.
  • Oct. G. H. Putnam & Son announced plans to issue a
    volume called The Cause of World Unrest, treating
    The Protocols of Zion as genuine.
  • Oct. Henry Ford issues a 25-cent, 250-page
    paperback version of The International Jew.
  • Nov. 1 Dayton Journal sues Chancellor for libel.
  • Nov. 2 Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge elected
    in landslide.
  • Nov. 2 Pittsburgh's KDKA broadcasts election
    returns.
  • Nov. 2New York Governor Alfred E. Smith and
    Tennessee Governor Albert H. Roberts defeated for re-
    election.
  • Nov. 2 Second woman elected to Congress,
    Oklahoma's Alice Robertson.
  • Nov. 2 Texas elects its first Republican
    congressman, Harry McLeary Wurzbach.
  • Nov. 2 Champ Clark, Victor Berger, and Cordell
    Hull defeated for Congress.
  • Nov. 2 California referendum approves alien land bill.
  • Nov. 2 Ocoee, Florida burned to ground after two
    black men attempt to vote.
  • Nov. 3 Nan Britton meets with Harding in Marion.
  • Nov. 20 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Woodrow
    Wilson.
  • Nov. 26 - Oklahoma Republican leader Jake Hamon
    dies of gunshot wound.
  • Dec. 16 Calvin Coolidge agrees to attend Cabinet
    meetings.
  • Dec. 19 Anti-Cigarette League asks President-Elect
    Harding not to use cigarettes.